Wednesday, January 5, 2011

Frequently Asked Questions

From time to time I get a fair number of repeat questions in the Comments sections of my blog posts.  So, as one such commenter suggested a while back, I thought it would make some sense to answer a lot of these questions, once and for all, all in one public place (and then link it in the side bar), so that hopefully people see the link, read the page and then don't need to either sift back through countless comment sections or post another comment of inquiry.  Part of the utility/beauty of a blog is its interactive format, but it is my hope that this particular page will save all of us a little time in the future.

What kind/model of shoes do you wear?
I wear New Balance shoes.  As of February 2013, my main shoe is the MT110. Light, low-to-the-ground, and with exceptional precision on technical terrain, I love that shoe.  In the winter I wear the MT110W, which is the 110 with an integrated zip-up gaiter.  These are great for many of the high-mountain missions I do in the winter where open mesh would mean frozen toes.  However, I am nearly always trying out some early-version prototype of various models of NB shoes (usually of either the 100-series or the Minimus-series), so these see some fairly heavy rotation as well.

Do you ever wear socks while running?
For much of my running career it was pretty rare if the weather was warm. I pretty much always wear socks in winter. However, in 2012 I started doing a lot of my running off-trail on steep, scrambly terrain.  This meant that I was getting a lot more gravel, dirt, scree, and loose forest debris coming into my shoes so I began wearing over-the-ankle socks quite a bit so that when this stuff does come into my shoes it doesn't affect my comfort. Probably my favorite sock is the Swiftwick Pursuit 4 which is a Merino Wool compression sock that is 4" high.  I love wool, the compression means it never falls down (something I always hated about socks), and the height is great for scree or snow.

How many miles of barefoot do you run per week?
It varies depending on the season (more in summer, less in winter), but I usually get 15-20mpw as true barefoot, which serves mainly for me to work on my form and keep my feet and lower legs strong.  All of this is done as barefoot laps around a flat, half-mile grass loop here in Boulder tacked on to the end of a longer run.

What is your typical diet/how do you eat enough to run that much?
I don't have one.  I consciously try to eat a lot of fresh, local fruits and vegetables, often purchased from the local farmer's market (April-November), but I definitely tend to eat a whole lot of straight-up carbs/sugar in the forms of pasta, breads, muffins, scones, cookies, Nutella on tortillas, chai, etc.  I probably eat too much sugar.  I don't eat any fast food, except for Illegal Pete's (local Chipotle-style burritos) here in Boulder, if that qualifies.

In terms of eating enough to handle the mileage, I don't have a secret diet, however, I think I probably do have a fairly unique (i.e. slow) metabolism, because I don't feel like I eat a ridiculous amount.  Or, maybe the quantity I eat is all I've ever known and it actually is a ridiculous amount.  Or, maybe other people just eat too much relative to the amount of activity they have in their lives thereby making my diet not feel so out of place.  I don't know.

Sweet carbs: a monster pan of pumpkin walnut chocolate chip muffins I baked.
Do you do any strength work?
Not really.  In high school I used to lift weights a lot.  I could bench press my body weight (150 lbs) twelve times.  In college I used to climb a lot and in addition to all the time on the rock I would regularly do pull-ups to assist in my efforts on the crag.  Now, however, any strength work is limited to a nominal, <5min core routine (total of ~150 reps of various crunches, some planks, etc.) that I'll do maybe 5x a week and some very specific hip/adductor/abductor strengthening exercises that I'll do to help prevent my form from breaking down as much late in a long race and causing my left knee to hurt.

Do you do any stretching?
Basically none, but I've recently realized the importance of maintaining some elasticity in my lower legs (achilles, soleus, calves, etc.), so I have begun paying a little closer attention to that, but no real formal routine of any type.

Do you get any massage, acupuncture, etc.?
I get frequent acupuncture work done courtesy of Allison Suddard at Peak Performance Acupuncture.  Despite being a pretty big skeptic, I began this type of treatment in early 2010 as a reference from Dr. Jeremy Rodgers at Colorado Sports Chiropractic (my preferred sportsmed doc) in order to improve the vascularity in my right patellar tendon (generally speaking) and have since found the Trigger Point Therapy to be very useful in preventing the usual little aches, pains and niggles that accompany hard training from turning into full-blown injuries.  This past year (2010) has been, by far, my most injury-free and consistent year of running of my entire career so far (only 16 days total off from running, with 12 being injury-related and almost all because of my strained calf this past month), and while I also like to credit this to accreted wisdom and a sense of relative moderation on my part, I know that regular acupuncture (probably an average of almost weekly sessions over the course of the year) has been a key factor in achieving that consistency in my running.

EDIT (6/23/2011): This spring I had my first sport massages from Jeff Staron at Boulder Sport and Injury, and while they were excrutiatingly painful, they seemed to be helpful in dealing with my posterior tibial tendonitis and I'd highly recommend him.

How (physically, financially, logistically, mentally) do you run so much?
Physically, it's something I've been doing for a long time (since 1995, first marathon in 1996 at age 12), so I have a relatively monstrous life-time base by this point (~57,000 miles at the end of 2010).  Also, I've had my fair share of injuries, but in general I think I'm blessed with fairly efficient, neutral biomechanics.

Financially, I've been quite frugal my entire life--some times radically so--and this has allowed me to get by with much less than what might be considered the norm.  With parents who were a high school teacher and a non-profit director/farmer, frugality has always basically been a necessity in my life and a habit I am thankful that my parents taught me.  I have spent several months at a time living voluntarily in my S-10 pick-up, The Roost.  I am fortunate to be supported by a research assistantship for my graduate studies and various sponsors, most significantly New Balance, in my running.  Combined with occasional free-lance writing/production of on-line content and running store/coffee shop gigs here and there, it has always been more than enough.

Logistically, it comes down to making running a no-brainer habit and nearly unassailable priority--oftentimes at the detriment of other things (not always good).  It comes down to basic discipline and living-out of a specific value-structure.

Mentally, ditto.

Frugal summer living in the Roost by the Dewey Bridge on the Colorado River near Moab, UT. Photo: Joe Grant.
Where/how do you carry your camera when you run?
When I carry a camera (a low-profile Sony Cybershot) running I keep it tucked in my waistband in an old soft eye-glasses case that has a clip on it.  I barely notice it most of the time.

What do you use to track time, distance, vertical gain, etc.?
My main piece of electronica is a Highgear Axio Max watch/altimeter.  It has a barometric altimeter (calculates altitude based on barometric pressure, not GPS), which I have found to be the most accurate type of tool for tracking vertical gain (of course, one must often calibrate the absolute elevation, but it does a pretty good job of catching the positive differentials).  As for mileage, I use a combination of MapMyRun and guesswork, usually.  I have a pretty good feel for what kind of pace I'm running/how fast I'm climbing and can usually come up with a pretty close estimate just based on running time.  However, some sections of trail (for example, Fern Canyon here in Boulder) can be deceiving and a friend's GPS often establishes a depressingly low value for those types of routes (the top of Bear Peak to the Mesa Trail via Fern Canyon is only about 1.5mi, but it drops ~2100' of elevation and typically takes me 16 or 17min...that's slower than 10min/mile pace going down).

How much do you eat/drink while running?
During training, on runs of 4 hours of more I generally eat one GU per hour after the first two hours.  I have found this to usually be enough but certainly not ideal in terms of energy needs.  In the summer I will carry a 20 oz. bottle on runs over 2 hours (and refill at streams when I feel the need).  In the winter, I generally need to be running 4 hours in order to bring a bottle along.  This kind of fueling allows me to keep running but I certainly finish my runs depleted and dehydrated for the most part.  I just replenish this after the run.

During races, depending on the weather and distances between water sources I will carry either one or two 20 oz. bottles.  I also drastically increase my sugar intake, eating a GU every 20-25min.  The plan is to never deprive myself of calories, and hopefully the restricted use in training has increased my body's ability to metabolize fat and hold onto water and salt.

How do you carry what you eat/drink while running?
I have a pair of home-modified running shorts that I can carry up to 10 gels in, which is usually more than enough for my longest training runs.  When I ran around Pikes Peak (68 miles/10hrs without resupply) in November 2010 I simply duct-taped together five more GUs and tucked them into my waistband, so that I was carrying 15 gels from the start.  Water is carried in a 20oz bottle usually with a home-made bike-tube handstrap.  I don't like the way that most waist-packs or backpacks ride while running, so I try to keep things simple and stripped to the essentials.

How do you eat/drink so little while running?
1) Practice 2) I think I have a slower metabolism than most.

Ever have any wildlife encounters?
Of course, but never anything too serious.  I've happened upon bears (a couple dozen over my ten years of running mountains, but no grizzlies), moose (probably the most tense encounters I've had), elk, and innumerable other more minor critters (deer, turkey, coyotes, marmots, etc).  My usual tactic is to be respectful and while I've, unfortunately, never seen a mountain lion it would be a privilege to do so one day.

75 comments:

peach fuzzzz said...

Hey Tony,

I was interested if you ever had any interest in going after some long trail records? (PCT, AT, Tahoe Rim, Rim to Rim etc.)

And what about UTMB? Are you going to up for that this year?

Hank

mtnrunner2 said...

Thanks for taking the time. Interesting info.

Because your 3-D maps seemed like GPS tracks, I assumed you wore a GPS foot pod like the one from Suunto or Timex on your long runs.

You kids never seem to need to stretch. I can't go without after runs for long, or the tension on my tendons builds and starts to produce aches and pains, and eventually injury.

Marian said...

Interesting, thanks.

It may not a good question, but it still interests me, do you not carry a cell phone or some first aid kit when running in mountains on your own?

Sean said...

Way to kill a bunch of birds with on stone.

FYI: I posted your baptism in Russia on my blog...

Charlie said...

Other questions you might consider adding:

1. Do you encounter dangerous wildlife on the trails like mountain lions and how do you deal with it?

2. Do you have any plans to write a book like big bad Dean Karnazes?

3. Do you see yourself running when you're 60 like Marco Olmo?

4. Is there a lot of yellow snow on Green Mtn.?

OK, these are probably not frequently asked questions. Thanks for taking the time on your blog to entertain and inspire us. That is some beautiful country out there.

goalscorermanutd said...

Tony

Let me ask you a serious question. Is it Humanly possible to run 100 miles in 12 hours? Or How many miles do you think you can cover in 12 hours on a flat, soft, fast course? There is a race here in Alabama that is a 1 mile loop at a park on a very flat and soft path. The female winner of badwater of 2 years ago used this course for pacing practice and covered 78 miles. I really think you could go for 100 miles in 12 hours..... I know it is far from you but free food and board here if your willing to try.. (delano 12) not to mention the prac/warmup for the big 100 milers. sorry to bother you! and goodluck in the future Toney your an amazing guy!

( i loved indulgence gr8 little film)

snarkyboojum said...

@goalscorermanutd, Yiannis Kouros (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yiannis_Kouros) ran 100 miles on track and road in under 12 hours. He's quoted as saying of his 24 hour track record in which he ran 303.506 km or over 188 miles (!), "I will run no more 24 hour races. This record will stand for centuries."

Don Ritchie from the UK did 100 miles in under 12 hours as well.

So yes, humanly possible, but very very difficult to say the least.

peeeete said...

Tony, thanks for posting and giving a bit more of an insight to yourself. 2 questions; 1 would you be willing to share the recipe for the muffins? they look delicious. 2 would you post a few short video clips of your core workouts and stretching that you do?
THanks and keep up the blogging, always a great read.
Peter

How Now Brown Cow said...

Some more:

- AJW claims that you don't wear sunscreen. Is this true?

- What ever happened to Kyle Skaggs? I heard that he was farming in New Mexico, but there's no way someone would give up the glamorous life of ultrarunning to do that.

- Can you ask the folks at New Balance to [make some change] to [some shoes]?

- Why didn't you "accidentally" trip Geoff when he passed you late in the race at the Western States last year?

- Hey! Aren't you the lead singer of the Fleet Foxes?

Alison Hanks, LMP said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Alison Hanks, LMP said...

very important question: top 10 albums of 2010 please and thank you.

Studly said...

What kind of tights are those that you wear in the winter?

Thanks for all the answers.
Seth

Lisa said...

Anton,
There is something quite appealing about your frugal lifestyle and the deep connection you have with your body and nature. I hope you do know how inspiring you are!

My question is, when you drink from the streams on your long runs, do you ever think about parasites? I realize there probably are no cows grazing up where you run but what about other animals? Where does the water come from? Snow melt? Deep springs? Does it taste sweet? You are the alpine hydrologist- tell me, por favor!

John said...

Can you suggest to NB that they make something wider than a D width in some of these minimalist shoes? I bought a larger size and they still were too narrow. I gave them to my son after tolerating them for just 7 miles.

Good call on the stretching; it's overrated unless it is before getting in or out of bed.

Sean said...

Thanks for the great info man. That clears up a lot of questions I think a lot of us had. (different Sean)

Ferran said...

Great idea Anton! About feeding I'm a lighter road runner, less than 110 pounds for 1'69 meters tall and I do an average of 60 miles/week. I've always thought that in absolute terms I eat less than a lot of non runners people.
Have a nice winter and thanks for carrying your camera!

My best wishes for you and your readers, from the mediterranean.

jeffhuizenga said...

Thanks for setting the bar high. In one of the fastest growing sports, I hope you know how many people that you motivate. If it wasn't for the elite and their blogs, I don't think many people would attempt to do the same. Thanks for helping the sport grow.

doug said...

Hey Tony,

Your blog is always inspirational.

I came across this quote that I thought you might find interesting when asked why we/you run..

I found an answer of sorts in a short story from a recent collection by Alexander McLeod. He writes in Miracle Mile:

“We have to scrounge for meaning wherever we can find it and there’s no way to separate our faith from our desperation. You see it everywhere. Football hooligans, scholars of Renaissance poetry, fans of heavy metal music, car buffs, sexual perverts, collectors of all kinds, extreme bungee jumpers, lonely physicists, long distance runners and tightly wound suburban housewives who want to make sure they entertain in just the right way. All of us. We can only value what we yearn for and it really does not matter what others think.”

erik said...

sick

Ryan said...

Anton,

I assume that you're not vegan, as you eat Nutella, but are you vegetarian?

Ryan

Cameron said...

Hey Tony, I have a question you just have answer and its got nothing to do with the running. Whats then recipe for the muffins, they look awesome.

Eric said...

Thought about adding your PRs to the FAQ's? I know, I know, PRs do mean much in the trail world, but it's often the only chance we mortals have in comparing our fitness to yours.
Thanks.

sonja said...

This is more of a clarifying question than an entirely new question. I was interested to read what you eat. I noticed you didn't mention any meat. Do you eat meat? Additionally, do you eat eggs and/or dairy? Do you think about protein consumption at all? Or just trust that it all will work out and you will crave (then eat) what you need? Just curious.

Chris said...

Can you please post the recipe for your pumpkin walnut chocolate chip muffins? They look awesome!

-Chris

Schwarzschild Radius said...

Tony,

Thank you!!!

1. I too am curious about wildlife encounters. Yes, I'm a city boy and only think about bears, mountain lions, and coyotes when you are doing those twilight am/pm runs.

2. Would love to see your name at UTMB. How do we make that happen?

Mike

Kieran McCarthy said...

I have a question, though perhaps not one that's frequently asked: How often do you fall? I fall pretty frequently - about once every ten runs or so on technical terrain. Given how often you run on technical stuff, even if you wipe out once every fifty runs, you still gotta have a decent log of falls.

carl said...

so, these forthcoming road racing flats.....what are the odds we'll be able to get our hands on them here in the states?

the last time you mentioned NB flats they ended up only being available in japan. (the 130s?)

i'm on my last pair of 152s and my 550s are way beyond their running days....(the 550s were the best, imo)

Chris Gerber said...

I think Illegal Petes is less like fast-food and more like manna from heaven. :)

Bret said...

Mr. Tony,

Thanks for taking the time to answer all those questions. I met you and friends at the bottom of Mt Evans one time, and your blog has inspired me ever since. Have an awesome 2011!

Billy said...

Good shit Tony.

That is all.

Billy said...

Oh 1 more thing: proud to say that I posed that inane "How much sunscreen does Tony go through?" question via Endurance Planet.

You're welcome runners.

Scott said...

One MUST respect the "Roost". I love it!! Well done sir, and thank you for sharing so much with us all.

ro6er said...

I feel better about my cookie addiction but, although you probably earn't it more than me..

Michael said...

Thanks, Dude!

mr everyday guy said...

So many people care about your diet? Strange...the only thing that should captivate is your ability to run steady weekly high efficient miles. Eat whatever you want my man, just run.

Fernando said...

Thks Anton for clarify some issues that we wondered.
Cheers from Spain!!

Speedgoat Karl said...

You just set yourself up for alot of questions. I have none.....See you at Rocky! :-)

Joe said...

Thanks Tony,

Two Questions:

As a very tall runner (6'7") I am curious how tall you are?

Do you log many miles before dark in the AM?

annie17 said...

Tony,

Thanks for the great information and the constant inspiration. I saw you break the record at the White River 50 this past summer. Are you planning to run it again this year?

Annie

Collin said...

One question... Karl said "See you at Rocky." Are you doing Rocky Raccoon again this year? Neither of you guys are on that list. The course is marginally slower now than it was when you ran it before, but you've got to be in infinitely better shape. Think you can hit that 13:16 trail record? I think a sub 13 would be a nice goal to shoot for. :)

David said...

You going to answer all these questions Tony? You may have no time for running if you try and answer them all :P Your a legend Tony and cannot wait to see you in action next year. Stay fit...and go run some more course records this year please ;) Can't wait to see what you have up your sleeve. One question....what about your future career and studies? Whats you career and work focus and goals in future? Is your brain as good as your legs? You seem to study very hard while making time for all that running. Regards, Belfast Dave

lonelyrunner said...

I read an article last year where the writer quoted Tony saying "it is all about the shear miles" or words to that effect, when referring to the main ingredient in long distance running. Question...Did Tony say this? If so, I want to use it.

Texafornia said...

Ha! I think I was the guy that inspired Tony to write the FAQ and look what happened... It's led to even more questions. LOL. Still, thanks!

Anton said...

Geez, I'll answer a couple questions, but must say I never really intended this to turn into some type of extended on-line Q+A:

peach fuzz-I am interested in attempting some of the more moderately-lengthed trail records: TRT, JMT, Wonderland Trail, and R2R2R all come to mind. UTMB is definitely in my future.

Marian-I never carry a cell phone while running.

Studly-A variety of NB tights.

Lisa-I am moderately discriminating in my untreated water sources. Depending on the time of year, most of the water I'm drinking is direct snowmelt (usually coming out from underneath a big drift above treeline) or groundwater (springs). I try to avoid surface water but sometimes it's all there is and I use my best judgement.

Ryan--not a vegan or a vegetarian, but I don't eat much meat unless I'm reasonably familiar (and comfortable) with it's source.

As for the muffin recipe, I couldn't even tell you; it was just some generic pumpkin bread recipe I pulled off the internet. Nothing special about it.

Vava said...

Thanks for taking the time to do this. Very interesting and informative. Running your first marathon at 12 is intense! I wonder if it was an official one given that they place strict age limits on those distances these days.

I'm very curious to know how you found your first marathon experience, if you ran it for fun or for time, what your time was (if that's at all important), and if you ran it with someone or alone, where it was, etc...

Perhaps if you are short on blog post ideas someday, or need something for Running Times, you could fill us in on your first marathon since, for us mere mortals, that is a real accomplishment and a big sign post along the way.

Cheers!

C.J. Hitz said...

Thanks for tackling these questions Tony. I'll add one to the kitty...
What is Kyle Skaggs up to these days?

Jane said...

Thanks for taking the time to do this. I've been a marathon runner for a while and recently started dabbling in the ultra scene. I did my first 50 this past October and it just about did me in...but I finished and would like to try again. While training, I kept up with your blog, and while I did nothing like what you do, I took motivation and tips from what you wrote.

Anyway, I just wanted to say that I have enjoyed your blog immensely and appreciate you taking the time to address these questions.

PEZ said...

You're the one.
Thanks!

g. anthony kunkel said...

Dude, its insane how many comments you got for this post! ive been keeping up with your blog for about 2.5 years now, and its been amazing seeing it all unfold. i remember the first time i found your blog, i thought to myself "this guy is living my life!" ive been lookin to move out to colorado for a while now -so i can atleast have a fair chance at getting good at ultras(Illinois sucks)- and its finally happening now, so id love to take a run with you some time once i get out there in three weeks.
im not sure if you respond to every comment you get, but id love to hear from you. and if youve got the time, check out my blog that i just started and tell me what you think, it would mean a ton to me.
http://endorfinjunky.blogspot.com/

Osmanli said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
CGK24 said...

Tony

I was looking for advice on workouts for high school distance runners and a friend of mine Andrew said he ran with you in high school and said that you workouts were much better than his and to ask you if you had time to lend some advice to a fellow Nebraskan.

Chris

Christopher said...

Tony,
Have you considered adding cycling to your workouts to balance out your leg muscles? There is evidence that you get good carryover from cycling to running. I use cycling to fatigue my legs while sparing my joints before doing my longest running workout the next day. No running injuries (joint or muscle) in 25 years using this. Just my 2 cents, if even that. You are a great inspiration to me and don't want to see your running cut short due to injuries.

Pietrus Gracchus said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Pietrus Gracchus said...

Hello,

why do you use MT101 for racing and not the MT10 "minimus" ?

I am just looking for the ideal shoe to race ultra.

Pietrus

Corn Runner said...

Hello, Anton

I am a 14 year old living in bettendorf Iowa named Eli and I love running. I thought it would be awesome if I could go for a run with you if you ever found yourself near the quad cities(Moline IL, bettendorf IA, davenport IA, and Rock Island IL). I know this is a little off topic but it still would be very tubular to go on a long run ( 13-18 miles) with a major ultra runner.

Court5km said...

Hi Anton,

Thanks for your sharing your way of life. It is truley genuine and real.

I loved your answer to the question what is your typical diet! Thank you for being one of the FEW athletes who say "I don't have a diet". Seriously! I am a registered dietitian and it is so interesting how many make diet out to be so complicated yet if we just focus on eating whole, real (in season) foods that can be our guide alone.

Beautifully said by you.

Athreya said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Athreya said...

Wow! a lot of questions... very inspiring read! Thanks for sharing.

Marc Trussler said...

Hey Anton,

I don't think you'll be reading these, but if you are, I have a question as a fellow 20 something grad-student/runner/music-fan.

Alcohol?

I know you go to some shows (some pretty good bands I may add). Do you simply abstain from any drinking? Keep it light? Deal with the hangover and run anyways?

I know you've commented on how important consistency is to your running. I've definitely missed training days due to hangovers, and you don't.... So what's the deal?

Josh Harris said...

Hi Anton, sorry to hear about your recent fall- I know how frustrating those types of injuries are. Also- the tibial tendonitis that you were dealing with earlier this year, how did you work through it? I'm experiencing the same issue with posterior tibial tendonitis, and its a difficult overuse injury to fix because even normal daily walking seems to inflame the tendon. I'm icing, but that isn't fixing it, and its been lingering for several months now. Very curious to hear how you worked through that.
Thanks!

Paul said...

Hey Tony, Paul here from NB Vancouver. Wasn't sure how to get ahold of you via NB so here it goes on your blog. The suits wouldn't give you up because I think they liked my idea too much;) I wanted to talk to you about coming up here and hosting a NB trail running clinic either in Vancouver or Whistler. Drop me a line at:
paul@newbalancevancouver.ca
Cheers! (I'm a huge fan and glad to see that things are on the mend!)

AD said...

Hi Tony

Echoing the comment from Josh Harris back in July 10th, could you let us know how you worked thru your tibial tendonitis injury?

I had just come to the point where I realized trail running was the answer for me, (as in for what to do with my life!) only to be stricken down with this stubborn injury and haven't run for 6 months. :(

A.

samedwardsrunning said...

Just when I thought every successful ultra runner was a sellout, I hear about what you do. I was beginning to think I was alone in my views of running, but I’m glad to see someone else shares them. Money, sponsors and media tend to make people forget what running means to them, and subsequently perpetrates the corruption of our most primal activity. Minimalism, modesty and morality are integral facets of humanity, and your persona embodies these ideologies. Thanks for “keeping it real”.

http://www.deadmanrunning.org

Maranui Aitamai said...

Hi Anton,
In which pair of shoes would you run a road marathon?
I'm looking for the best road shoes, I actually run on road with the Minimus Trail 10 but I don't think they will be OK for the road marathon I want to run in 3 weeks.
Any advice? thanks in advance.
Mara (from Tahiti)

Saul Oliveira said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
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Zdeněk said...

Hi Tony,
Iam a big fan of yours and Iam courious about your surname. You probably get this a lot but do you have any idea what is the origin of it? It really sounds to me like Krupička in Czech language. Funny is that there is even Robert Krupička who is quite succesfull Czech marathon runner. If it turned out that you have Czech ancestors I would be so proud :).
Anyway all the best
Zdeněk from Czech republic

Niklas said...

On being competitive; i find some have probs with a guy as laid back as you still being competitive. Its like racing each other is unnatural and uncool. I beg to differ. Its the reason for competing that makes a difference. Like life in general, running is a game we play to have fun and socialize. In that you cam be competetive as hell and still laugh about it. But when its about prestige and creds it will turn sour in the end. You win to live and die when defeated. Thats not being competitive but neurotic. Its competing with Self and not Others. Racing with others is all about fun and bringing out the best in each other. Its basically good.
Happy Hiking :)

samur said...

Hi :) Why do you always run so early in the morning? I mean 1-4 AM is *early*. Also how long do you sleep a day?

Thanks! You're an inspiration for many runners out there!

Scott said...

Hey Anton!

Random question, I saw this photo on a website that collects cabin photos.

http://freecabinporn.com/post/22392672528/1947-schoolhouse-outside-of-boulder-colorado

is this you? seems to be a pretty good doppelganger if not...

Juan said...

Hi Anton,

I've seen yourself couple of times running with some sportiva shoes and I'm wondering why. Are your NB MT110 not strong enough for rocks and high mountain runs? What sportiva shoes do you use for those cases?

cheers!

finndawg48 said...

Tony,

Any advice for dealing with tendonitis? I thought it was behind me, but started having issues again.

Jake-

Jim Venne said...

Hi Anton,

I will run my first marathon this year and am currently training for it. Right now I am running inside because of our Canadian winter (average of -10 celsius) but I want to go outside. What gear would you suggest for these temps? (running in minimalist shoes).

Lee said...

Hya..
Pleasure to see such a pure approach to life and easy to see why where you live..
Really enjoyed watching In the High Country but feel compelled to say..if you push the limits too much no matter how spiritual it becomes you can still come unstuck..take care, stay safe and all the best..
Many thanks also..
Lee

Adjul said...

Hi there, I did some traditional running in high school (track, cross-country) and then shortly after college I became involved in a wilderness school that focused on ancestral traditions (not just hard skills like firemaking and gathering food, ect., but also the cultural traditions of indigenous people).
Long story short, one recent manifestation of that has been running more like a native person would. Of course - like all things - this is a holistic practice and brings in facets people might label as "meditation" or "spirituality" as well as straight-up body mechanics.
This is something I'm eager to share, and I get a sense is rare to find in the running world, even on the fringes. I've made a short-documentary on my experience which is linked below. I invite any feedback on how this relates to your own practices and experiences.
Best,
Adjul

Intuitive Running Full Version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6540kY_498